FB Fertility Preservation – Embryolab EN
Fertility Preservation

Women today can take into their own hands their plans regarding reproduction. The timely and safe preservation of their oocytes allow them to manage their fertility for the future and make all those important decisions which affect them directly. Cancer patients can preserve their fertility and become parents after their therapy is over.

Through sperm cryopreservation, the fertility in a man is safeguarded and the likelihood of him becoming a biological father in the future is increased.

FOR THE WOMAN


Scientific research and findings show that more than 95% of oocytes that have been cryopreserved can be safely used for fertilisation purposes and with the same success rate of fresh oocytes!

Egg cryopreservation is very important for women who:

  • Have been diagnosed with a malignant disease
  • Delay offspring for later in their lives
  • Have a family history of early menopause.

Stages of a fertility preservation program

The woman is addressed to a Medical Assisted Reproduction Unit specializing in the cryopreservation process of oocytes before starting any treatment that may affect her fertility.
A special treatment which lasts 8 to 10 days begins to stimulate the ovaries to produce several eggs
Oocytes are collected by the process of oocyte retrieval and are cryopreserved by the vitrification process.
The oocytes can remain in the cryopreservation for 5 years with the possibility of an extension for another 5.

Through sperm cryopreservation, the fertility in a man is safeguarded and the likelihood of him becoming a biological father in the future is increased.

FOR THE MAN


Sperm cryopreservation has been in clinical use for many years now, allowing many men to have a child even after therapies which otherwise would have meant the permanent or temporary loss of fertility.

Sperm cryopreservation is particularly useful for men who:

  • Have been diagnosed with a malignant disease
  • Are about to undergo an operation on the testicles
  • Are exposed to chemical substances, particularly pesticides, fertilizers or insecticides
  • Have their testicles exposed to high temperatures
  • Have a history of oligoasthenozoospermia